Fashion explaining the gen z maximalism trend

Fashion explaining the gen z maximalism trend
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  I swear 90% of art school kids dress like this.  So, similar to my previous aesthetic breakdown. Videos  like the Old Money aesthetic and balletcore,  we’re going to be diving into the origins of this style  and the. Cultural meanings.  (jazz music)  So I actually wanna start this video  with a little bit of Harajuku history.  A lot of today’s maximalist styling  takes influence from harajuku styles.Whether or not people are aware of it.  Case in point, Marc Jacobs’ line “Heaven  which was coined. in the press as  “offering a slither of Marc’s subversive aesthetic  and approach to fashion all while foregoing gender norms  by focusing on a new generation of fashion creatives.”  “Heaven”, since its incarnation,  has gained a massive Gen Z following,

Founder

with celebrity cool girl icons such as Bella Hadid,  Beabadoobee and PinkPantheress helping to promote the brand.  “Heaven” also hasn’t shied away  from its Harajuku influences.  Shoichi Aoki, founder of Japanese street fashion magazine  “FRUiTS”, was commissioned to capture  12 icons self-styling “Heaven” pieces  for their first official lookbook.  But let me backtrack.  For anyone who’s unfamiliar with Harajuku,  it’s an area of Tokyo, Japan,  famous for its eclectic street fashion  in the 90s and early 2000s.  Gwen Stefani infamously made an entire album  called “Love. Angel. Music. Baby.”  which were the stage names of the Japanese backup dancers  she hired to follow her around everywhere,  also known as the Harajuku Girls.

Style

 But otherwise, Shoichi Aoki notes  that it wasn’t until around 1996  when a turning point was reached in Japanese fashion.  He notes that at this time there were, like, no trends.  So people mixed brands, reconstructed  and deconstructed garments,  incorporated traditional Japanese clothes, and so forth.  Japan was very influenced by what was actually happening  in the streets of London.  Secondhand clothing for a long time  wasn’t viewed as fashionable in Japan, 


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